Camera Language for Cinematics and Full Motion Video

More than five years ago I created a series of videos for my students to learn the language of camera...

More than five years ago I created a series of videos for my students to learn the language of camera at http://camera.lgrace.com. I was teaching a scriptwriting for games course and a scriptwriting for digital film course. I wanted single, easy to browse examples of common shots and transitions for them to use as a reference. I uploaded a little over half of the 30+ videos to YouTube today.

Each video provides, a quick simple animation that demonstrates a particular camera shot or transition.  I hope these help the next budding set of scriptwriters and animators or perhaps they are useful for test.  Sorry for the low quality images, but these are old renders.  The work was done in a few days.

The site contains a basic glossary:
http://camera.lgrace.com/Language_Guide.htm

and a shot guide:

http://camera.lgrace.com/Shot_Guide.htm

Each of the videos is listed below:

Crane Down, Move Toward: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lzrq8sMEuPk

Crane Up: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=65tgFnZZ0T8

Crane Up, Move Away: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U2PYVRLmh3s

Degree Dolly: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8jywcldiFGg

Standard Dolly: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jxlKzUsBqKk

Follow Shot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wqKal8uetjo

Pan Left: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z678_-H6sNM

Pull Back Reveal: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H2rrJP7_fAA

Rise Up: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2K1-09Q2Wsw

Search Shot: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCtLF6FH9VI

Zoom: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xc2v9LODaa4

Spin Look: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fiQVy59cZQ4

Reverse Angle: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnU_xmC213I

About admin

Lindsay Grace is a teacher, software developer and designer. He has served industry as an independent consultant, web designer, software developer, entrepreneur, business analyst and writer. Lindsay has a joint position between Miami University’s Armstrong Institute for Interactive Media Studies and the School of Fine Arts. His research areas include human-computer interaction, creative and critical gameplay, and web design. He writes regularly about interactive media design and education.